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Essay on Job Stress at Work Place

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❶When practicing meditation, our heart rate and breathing slow down, blood pressure normalizes, sweat less, and we use oxygen more efficiently. The ability to tolerate stress depends on many factors, including the quality of a person's relationships, general outlook on life, emotional intelligence, and genetics.




As a result, our heart pounds faster, muscles tighten, blood pressure rises, breath quickens, and senses become sharper. These physical changes increase our strength and stamina, speed our reaction time, and enhance our focus, thus preparing us to either fight or flee from the danger at hand. This reaction to a real or imagined danger is called the stress response. The stress response is the body's way of protecting us. When working properly, it helps us to stay focused, energetic, and alert.

In emergency situations, stress can save our life by giving us extra strength, or for example, spurring us to slam on the brakes to avoid an accident.

The stress response also helps us rise to meet challenges. It keeps us on our toes during a presentation at work, sharpens our concentration when attempting the game-winning free throw, or drives us to study for an exam when we would rather be watching TV. But beyond a certain point, stress stops being helpful and starts causing major damage to our health, mood, productivity, relationships, and our quality of life.

It is important to understand that our body does not distinguish between physical and psychological threats. When we are stressed over a busy schedule, an argument with a friend, a traffic jam, or a mountain of bills, our body reacts just as strongly as if we were facing a life- or-death situation. If someone has a lot of responsibilities and worries, chances are that their emergency stress response may be 'on' most of the time.

The more our body's stress system is activated, the easier it is to trip and the harder it is to shut off. Leading a long-term stressful life can even rewire the brain, leaving us more vulnerable to anxiety and depression. Chronic stress disrupts nearly every system in our body. It can raise blood pressure, suppress the immune system, increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, contribute to infertility, and speed up the aging process. Problems related to sleep and digestion, obesity, autoimmune diseases, and skin conditions such as eczema are some other health problems that or caused or exacerbated by stress.

The ability to withstand stress differs from person to person. While some people seem to thrive on the excitement and challenge of a high- stress lifestyle, others crumble at the slightest obstacle or frustration.

The ability to tolerate stress depends on many factors, including the quality of a person's relationships, general outlook on life, emotional intelligence, and genetics. The situations and pressures that cause stress are known as stressors. We usually think of stressors as being negative, such as an exhausting work schedule or a rocky relationship or death of someone close. However, anything that puts high demands on us or forces us to adjust can be stressful.

This includes positive events such as getting married, buying a house, going to college, or receiving a promotion. Also, to an extent, what causes stress depends on our perception of it. Something that is stressful to a person may be enjoyed by someone else. For example, a person may get stressed while going to office due to his anxiety that traffic will make him late, while another may find the trip relaxing and enjoy listening to music while he drives. Stress can also be self-generated.

It may occur due to children and family, being too busy, inability to accept uncertainty, pessimism, perfectionism, lack of assertiveness, unrealistic expectations, etc.

The most dangerous thing about stress is that it can easily creep up on us, to the extent that we get used to it. We start to feel familiar, even normal, and it takes a heavy toll without even our noticing how much it is affecting us.

The signs and symptoms of stress overload can be almost anything. Stress affects the mind, body, and behavior in many ways, and everyone experiences stress differently. Some of the physical symptoms of stress are headaches, nervousness, rashes, stomachaches, fast heartbeat, perspiration, and increased urination.

Some signs of mental stress include lack of concentration, forgetfulness, drop in school performance, and carelessness. Boredom, anger outburst, nightmares, depression, withdrawal syndrome, and anxiety attacks are the common emotional signs of stress. If you have signs of stress very often, it is better to do something about it so you can improve your quality of life. Prolonged and unwanted stress can have undesirable effects on mental and physical health; although reactions may differ form each individual.

A number of stress-related disorders that are known are heart disease, depression, and high blood pressure or hypertension, which can damage the kidneys and can lead to stroke. Respiratory disorders can also be affected by stress. Most common of theses is asthma, which may cause emotional upsets.

In addition, emotional stress can also aggravate skin disorders that produce itching, tickling, and rashes. Post-traumatic disorder is also a serious illness brought about by major traumatic events. It is evident that stress is really a part of our life. Due to this fact, it is important for us to know how to cope up and how to minimize it.

We can do this by exercising and eating nutritional food regularly. Also, we should avoid excess caffeine intake, illegal drugs, alcohol, and tobacco, which can increase feelings of anxiety and agitation. Taking a break from stressful situations can also be useful. Activities like listening to music, talking to a friend, drawing, writing, or spending time with a pet can reduce stress.

We should also learn to decrease negative self talk. Challenge negative thoughts about yourself with alternative neutral or positive thoughts. Stress can either make us or break us; it just depends on how we deal with it. It is important for us to recognize the early symptoms of stress so that we may be able to work on it to lead a better quality of life.

With determination and proper execution, we can use stress as a positive thing for us, rather than letting it be a hindrance to our goals and dreams in life. Informative Essay on Stress. Accessed September 14, We will write a custom essay sample on Informative Essay on Stress specifically for you. Leave your email and we will send you an example after 24 hours If you contact us after hours, we'll get back to you in 24 hours or less. Informative Essay on Stress Essay. How to cite this page Choose cite format: Symptoms and Effects on People.

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Essay on Stress in the Workplace Words | 10 Pages. Jones Final Paper: Stress in the workplace June 18, BUS Organizational Business Instructor: Gary Priest Final Paper: Stress in the workplace Organizational behavior is the study of individuals and their behavior within an organized work environment.

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Job related stress is a widespread problem in the workplace today. There are many different causes of stress, called stressors and they vary from person to person. People must be aware of the signs of stress, and try to prevent it before it begins affecting their lives. Stress has both mental and /5(19).

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Key words: Work-related stress, Job Satisfaction, Health, Service delivery, UAE. 1. Introduction. The work related stress has now been recognized as world-wide challenge for workers as wells as for the organizations. This can serious cause the workers’ health and can also cause the organizations to face loses. - Stress in the Work-Place Abstract Over the years, stress at work has been a key topical issue to the world over. Robert C. Dailey, in his book Understanding People In Organisations, defines stress as "any demand made on the body that requires psychological or physical adjustment.".

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Stress is the state of tension experienced by individuals facing too many demands, constraints or opportunities. Work is sometime stressful and can easily disrupt a person's work-life balance. Work related stress comes from numerous factors such as too many task demands, role conflicts, job boredom, ethical dilemmas, or interpersonal problems. Stress is much more than just a fastidious situation. Stress basically is a responsive reaction of an individual to a particular situation. This is why stress is usually difficult to cope with because every person reacts differently to a certain situation. Overwork, job insecurity, and other numerous factors have a negative effect on a person.