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Types Of Quantitative Research for Students and Researchers

How Quantitative Research Works

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Quantitative research

Types of research
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If a researcher studied developmental milestones of preschool children and target licensed preschools to collect the data, the sampling frame would be all preschool aged children in those preschools. Students in those preschools could then be selected at random through a systematic method to participate in the study.

This does, however, lead to a discussion of biases in research. For example, low-income children may be less likely to be enrolled in preschool and therefore, may be excluded from the study. Extra care has to be taken to control biases when determining sampling techniques.

There are two main types of sampling: The difference between the two types is whether or not the sampling selection involves randomization. Randomization occurs when all members of the sampling frame have an equal opportunity of being selected for the study. Following is a discussion of probability and non-probability sampling and the different types of each.

Probability Sampling — Uses randomization and takes steps to ensure all members of a population have a chance of being selected. There are several variations on this type of sampling and following is a list of ways probability sampling may occur:.

Non-probability Sampling — Does not rely on the use of randomization techniques to select members. This is typically done in studies where randomization is not possible in order to obtain a representative sample. Bias is more of a concern with this type of sampling. The different types of non-probability sampling are as follows:. The following Slideshare presentation, Sampling in Quantitative and Qualitative Research — A practical how to, offers an overview of sampling methods for quantitative research and contrasts them with qualitative method for further understanding.

Examples of Data Collection Methods — Following is a link to a chart of data collection methods that examines types of data collection, advantages and challenges. Qualitative and Quantitative Data Collection Methods - The link below provides specific example of instruments and methods used to collect quantitative data. Sampling and Measurement - The link below defines sampling and discusses types of probability and nonprobability sampling.

Principles of Sociological Inquiry — Qualitative and Quantitative Methods — The following resources provides a discussion of sampling methods and provides examples.

This pin will expire , on Change. This pin never expires. Select an expiration date. The researcher does not assign groups and does not manipulate the independent variable. Control groups are identified and exposed to the variable.

Results are compared with results from groups not exposed to the variable. Experimental Designs , often called true experimentation, use the scientific method to establish cause-effect relationship among a group of variables in a research study.

Researchers make an effort to control for all variables except the one being manipulated the independent variable. The effects of the independent variable on the dependent variable are collected and analyzed for a relationship. When deciding on the appropriate approach, the Decision Tree from Ebling Library may be helpful.

The following video, Quantitative Research Designs, further describes the differences between quantitative research approaches and offers tips on how to decide on methodology.

Planning the Methodology — The Quantitative Pathway — The following link provides a description of the four types of quantitative approaches and examples of each. Quantitative Design — The following resource describes quantitative research approaches and exmaples.

Choosing an appropriate study design — Below is a link to a presentation that describes the factors to consider when choosing the appropriate approach for quantitative research. This pin will expire , on Change. This pin never expires. Select an expiration date. About Us Contact Us. Search Community Search Community. Quantitative Approaches In this module, the four approaches to quantitative research are described and examples are provided.

List and explain the four approaches to quantitative research. Provide an example of each method. Describe how to identify the appropriate approach for a particular research problem.

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Jun 09,  · Quantitative research is a type of empirical investigation. That means the research focuses on verifiable observation as opposed to theory or logic. Most often this type of research is expressed in numbers. A researcher will represent and manipulate certain Author: April Klazema.

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Quantitative Approaches. In this module, the four approaches to quantitative research are described and examples are provided. Learning Objectives: List and explain the four approaches to quantitative research. Provide an example of each method. Describe how to identify the appropriate approach for a particular research problem.

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Descriptive research method is a type of quantitative research method that classifies without expressing feelings or judging. It involves the collection of data to obtain results and answers regarding the hypothesis and/or the status of the subjects covered in the research. Quantitative Research Methods: Types with Examples The types of quantitative research are classified on the basis of data collection sources. As mentioned earlier, this research method is highly numerical and the results are in form of “data”.

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Types of Research within Qualitative and Quantitative Search this Guide Search. Sampling Methods and Statistics There are four (4) main types of quantitative designs: descriptive, correlational, quasi-experimental, and experimental. Pragmatic researchers therefore grant themselves the freedom to use any of the methods, techniques and procedures typically associated with quantitative or qualitative research. They recognise that every method has its limitations and that the different approaches can be complementary.