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Case Study Academic Writers

How to Write a Case Study

❶Request data and materials from subjects as applicable to add credibility to your findings and future presentations of your case study. What should be in your research design when doing a case study.

General Instructions

Introduction
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Yes or no responses. Statistics relating to the use of a new product. Additional resources for your research. Develop and write your case study using the data collected throughout the research, interviewing and analysis processes. Include at least four sections in your case study: The introduction should very clearly set the stage. In a detective story, the crime happens right at the beginning and the detective has to put together the information to solve it for the rest of the story.

In a case, you can start by raising a question. You could quote someone you interviewed. Make sure to include background information on your study site, why your interviewees are a good sample, and what makes your problem pressing to give your audience a panoramic view of the issue.

After you've clearly stated the problem at hand, of course. After the reader has all the knowledge needed to understand the problem, present your data. Include customer quotes and data percentages, awards and findings if possible to add a personal touch and more credibility to the case presented. You may have to do calculations or extra research yourself to back up any claims.

At the end of your analysis, you should offer possible solutions, but don't worry about solving the case itself. You may find referring to some interviewees' statements will do the alluding for you. Let the reader leave with a full grasp of the problem, but trying to come up with their own desire to change it. If you have written a good case, they will have enough information to understand the situation and have a lively class discussion. Add references and appendices if any. Just like you would in any other paper, reference your sources.

That's why you got credible ones in the first place. And if you have any information that relates to the study but would have interrupted the flow of the body, include it now.

You may have terms that would be hard for other cultures to understand. If this is the case, include it in the appendix or in a Note for the Instructor. Make additions and deletions. As your work is forming, you'll notice that it may morph into an object you didn't otherwise expect.

If it does so, make additions and deletions as needed. You may find that information you once thought pertinent is no longer. Go over your study section by section, but also as a whole. Each data point needs to fit into both it's place and the entirety of the work. If you can't find an appropriate place for something, stick it in the appendix. Edit and proofread your work. Now that your paper is formulated, look for minute revisions.

As always, correct any grammar, spelling and punctuation errors, but also keep an eye out for flow and transition. Is everything placed and worded as efficiently as possible?

Have someone else proofread, too. Your mind may have become oblivious to the errors it has seen times. Another set of eyes may also notice content that has been left open-ended or is otherwise confusing. Method 4 Quiz Which of these is a section that you should you include in your case study? All of the above. The simplest thing would be to identify the situation and key problems. Include them in the introductory section of your case study. Once you have done that, identify how those problems were solved.

This will bring you to the next section - Solution - this is the most technical part, in which you have to explain the solution and its components. Once done, figure out the benefits achieved and list them. The concluding remarks can talk about takeaways, future prospects and recommendations. Not Helpful 0 Helpful Use primary sources to research the background and events, then write about what happened and why it is important.

Not Helpful 3 Helpful 9. Open Power Point, then write your case study. Use charts, graphs and other visual representations. Not Helpful 7 Helpful 5. Use brutal honesty, but do not be opinionated. State the true facts, and use appropriate language regarding the situation. Try to speak with the significant other about these facts, in order to represent the full story. Not Helpful 5 Helpful 1.

How can I write a case study on challenges faced by teachers when teaching social studies? You can probably interview a cross-section of teachers teaching social studies, and ask them what challenges they face. Then write a case study presenting your results. Not Helpful 0 Helpful 0. How can I write case study on students becoming poor and brilliant in different subjects? Answer this question Flag as How do a write a case study on an agriculture NGO in Africa?

How do I write a case study on a personal experience? How do I write a case study on the roles of a dysfunctional family for an addict? J Can Chirop Assoc ; 35 2: J Can Chiropr Assoc ; 51 2: General Instructions This set of guidelines provides both instructions and a template for the writing of case reports for publication. The title page will contain the full title of the article.

Remember that many people may find our article by searching on the internet. They may have to decide, just by looking at the title, whether or not they want to access the full article. A title which is vague or non-specific may not attract their attention.

The two most common formats of titles are nominal and compound. Other contents for the title page should be as in the general JCCA instructions to authors. Remember that for a case study, we would not expect to have more than one or two authors.

In order to be listed as an author, a person must have an intellectual stake in the writing — at the very least they must be able to explain and even defend the article. Someone who has only provided technical assistance, as valuable as that may be, may be acknowledged at the end of the article, but would not be listed as an author. If there is more than one author, one author must be identified as the corresponding author — the person whom people should contact if they have questions or comments about the study.

Provide key words under which the article will be listed. These are the words which would be used when searching for the article using a search engine such as Medline.

When practical, we should choose key words from a standard list of keywords, such as MeSH Medical subject headings. A copy of MeSH is available in most libraries. A narrative abstract consists of a short version of the whole paper.

There are no headings within the narrative abstract. The author simply tries to summarize the paper into a story which flows logically. A structured abstract uses subheadings. Structured abstracts are becoming more popular for basic scientific and clinical studies, since they standardize the abstract and ensure that certain information is included. This is very useful for readers who search for articles on the internet. Often the abstract is displayed by a search engine, and on the basis of the abstract the reader will decide whether or not to download the full article which may require payment of a fee.

With a structured abstract, the reader is more likely to be given the information which they need to decide whether to go on to the full article, and so this style is encouraged. The JCCA recommends the use of structured abstracts for case studies. Since they are summaries, both narrative and structured abstracts are easier to write once we have finished the rest of the article. We include a template for a structured abstract and encourage authors to make use of it.

Our sub-headings will be: This consists of one or two sentences to describe the context of the case and summarize the entire article. Several sentences describe the history and results of any examinations performed. The working diagnosis and management of the case are described.

Synthesize the foregoing subsections and explain both correlations and apparent inconsistencies. If appropriate to the case, within one or two sentences describe the lessons to be learned. At the beginning of these guidelines we suggested that we need to have a clear idea of what is particularly interesting about the case we want to describe.

The introduction is where we convey this to the reader. It is useful to begin by placing the study in a historical or social context. If similar cases have been reported previously, we describe them briefly. If there is something especially challenging about the diagnosis or management of the condition that we are describing, now is our chance to bring that out. Each time we refer to a previous study, we cite the reference usually at the end of the sentence.

This is the part of the paper in which we introduce the raw data. First, we describe the complaint that brought the patient to us. Next, we introduce the important information that we obtained from our history-taking. Also, we should try to present patient information in a narrative form — full sentences which efficiently summarize the results of our questioning.

We may or may not choose to include this list at the end of this section of the case presentation. The next step is to describe the results of our clinical examination. Again, we should write in an efficient narrative style, restricting ourselves to the relevant information. It is not necessary to include every detail in our clinical notes. If we are using a named orthopedic or neurological test, it is best to both name and describe the test since some people may know the test by a different name.

X-rays or other images are only helpful if they are clear enough to be easily reproduced and if they are accompanied by a legend. Be sure that any information that might identify a patient is removed before the image is submitted. At this point, or at the beginning of the next section, we will want to present our working diagnosis or clinical impression of the patient. In this section, we should clearly describe the plan for care, as well as the care which was actually provided, and the outcome.

It is useful for the reader to know how long the patient was under care and how many times they were treated. If you are working with more than one person you will want to assign sections for completion together to make sure your case study will flow. For example, one person may be in charge of making charts of the data you gathered, while other people will each write an analysis of one of your bullet points you are trying to answer.

Write your final case study report. Based on the research questions you designed and the type of case study you conducted, this may be a descriptive report, an analytic argument grounded in a specific case, or a suggested direction for further research or projects. Include your most relevant observations and interviews in the case study itself, and consider attaching additional data such as full interviews as an appendix for readers to refer to.

If writing a case study for a non-academic audience, consider using a narrative form, describing the events that occurred during your case study in chronological order.

Minimize your use of jargon. Ask permission from a client. A marketing case study describes a "success story" between a business and a client.

Ideally, the client has recently interacted with your business, and is enthusiastic about contributing a positive message. Choose a client close to your target audience, if possible. A typical marketing case study begins by describing the client's problems and background.

It then rapidly moves on to describe how your company strategically approached these problems, and succeeded in fixing them to a high standard. Finish by describing how you can apply similar solutions across the industry. The entire case study should divide into about three to five sections. If your target audience wouldn't immediately identify with your client's problem, start with a more general intro describing that type of problem in the industry.

Keep the study readable and powerful. Use bold text and headers to divide the case study into easy-to-read sections. Start each section with short, action sentences and strong verbs.

Use numeric examples that demonstrate how effective your solutions were. Make this as clear as possible, using actual numbers instead of or in addition to percentages. For example, an HR department could show impressive retention numbers following a process change, while a marketing team could demonstrate past sales boosts from its service. Charts and graphs can be great visual tools, but label these with large letters that make the positive meaning obvious to people who aren't used to reading raw data.

Solicit quotes or write them yourself. You'll definitely want to quote positive recommendations from your client. Often, however, the person writing these will not have a marketing background. Ask the client whether you can write the statements for them, although of course the client will sign off on these before publication.

Include photos and other images to make your case study more attractive. One tactic that can work well is to solicit photographs from the client. An amateur digital photograph of the smiling client team can add a genuine touch.

Make your marketing case study widely available. My case study is on the impact of direct marketing and the profitability of Centenary Bank. How can I approach it?

Know what you want to find out, what you believe you will find, and what you believe you will not find. Try making an outline approach to writing your case study. There may be certain requirements you haven't included here. Not Helpful 0 Helpful 5. Not Helpful 1 Helpful 2. When inserting an image into the case study, how do I label and present it? It depends on the image and relevance. That is really a question to ask your professor or research partner as you might be bound by specific format requirements.

Generally, you would add a label underneath the photo that identifies what it is, and a short blurb under that to explain its relevance to the study. Not Helpful 0 Helpful 0. What should be in your research design when doing a case study. Answer this question Flag as How do I do a case study on arson and murder?

How can I do a case study on how roles and functions contribute to organisational performance? How could you do a case study related to Magi, India?

How do I write a case study on evaluation of a new health intervention?


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Drafting the Case. Once you have gathered the necessary information, a draft of your analysis should include these sections: Introduction. Identify the key problems and issues in the case study. Formulate and include a thesis statement, summarizing the outcome of your analysis in 1–2 sentences. Background. Set the scene: background information, .

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A case study paper usually examines a single subject of analysis, but case study papers can also be designed as a comparative investigation that shows relationships between two or among more than two subjects. The methods used to study a case can rest within a quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-method investigative paradigm.

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Guidelines to the writing of case studies. Dr. Brian Budgell, DC, PhD * This is the part of the paper in which we introduce the raw data. First, we describe the complaint that brought the patient to us. and actually used to support the case study. Do not use more than approximately 15 references without some clear justification. Try to. Case Study Academic Writers. Writing a case study is not every person’s forte. If you are having trouble developing a case study, know that you are not alone.

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